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New York Development of Port of New York 43/22

Chapter 43 of the laws of 1922 relating to
                   the development of the port of New York
    Whereas,  The  states  of  New York and New Jersey on the thirtieth of
  April, nineteen hundred and twenty-one, pursuant to chapter one  hundred
  and  fifty-four  of  the  laws of nineteen hundred and twenty-one of New
  York and chapter one hundred and  fifty-one  of  the  laws  of  nineteen
  hundred  and  twenty-one  of  New  Jersey,  did  enter into a compact or
  agreement which pledged the two states to faithful  cooperation  in  the
  future  planning  and  development  of  the port of New York, and which,
  furthermore,  created  the  port  of  New  York  district,  as   therein
  described,  and  the  port  of  New  York  authority, a body politic and
  corporate, as  an  instrumentality  or  agency  of  the  two  states  to
  effectuate such pledge of cooperation;
    And  whereas,  The  said  compact or agreement provides in article ten
  thereof that the "legislatures of the two states, prior to  the  signing
  of  this  agreement,  or  thereafter as soon as may be practicable, will
  adopt a plan or plans for the comprehensive development of the  port  of
  New York";
    Now,  therefore  (the  state  of New Jersey by appropriate legislation
  concurring therein), the following be and it is hereby  adopted  as  the
  comprehensive plan for the development of the port of New York under and
  pursuant to said compact or agreement:
    Section 1. Principles to govern the development:
    First.  That  terminal  operations within the port district, so far as
  economically practicable, should be unified;
    Second. That there should be  consolidation  of  shipments  at  proper
  classification   points  so  as  to  eliminate  duplication  of  effort,
  inefficient loading of equipment and realize reduction in expenses;
    Third. That there should be the most direct routing of all commodities
  so as to avoid centers of  congestion,  conflicting  currents  and  long
  truck-hauls;
    Fourth.  That  terminal  stations  established under the comprehensive
  plan should be union stations, so far as practicable;
    Fifth. That the process of coordinating facilities should  so  far  as
  practicable  adapt  existing  facilities  as  integral  parts of the new
  system,  so  as  to  avoid  needless  destruction  of  existing  capital
  investment and reduce so far as may be possible the requirements for new
  capital;  and  endeavor  should  be  made to obtain the consent of local
  municipalities within the port district for the  coordination  of  their
  present  and  contemplated  port  and terminal facilities with the whole
  plan.
    Sixth. That freight from all railroads must be brought to all parts of
  the port wherever practicable  without  cars  breaking  bulk,  and  this
  necessitates  tunnel  connection between New Jersey and Long Island, and
  tunnel or bridge connections between other parts of the port;
    Seventh. That there should  be  urged  upon  the  federal  authorities
  improvement of channels so as to give access for that type of waterborne
  commerce   adapted  to  the  various  forms  of  development  which  the
  respective shorefronts and adjacent lands of the port  would  best  lend
  themselves to;
    Eighth. That highways for motor truck traffic should be laid out so as
  to permit the most efficient inter-relation between terminals, piers and
  industrial establishments not equipped with railroad sidings and for the
  distribution of building materials and many other commodities which must
  be  handled  by  trucks;  these  highways  to  connect  with existing or
  projected bridges, tunnels and ferries.
    Ninth. That definite methods for prompt relief should be devised which
  can be applied for the better coordination  and  operation  of  existing

  facilities   while  larger  and  more  comprehensive  plans  for  future
  development are being carried out.
    §  2.  The  bridges,  tunnels and belt lines forming the comprehensive
  plan are generally and in outline indicated on maps filed by the port of
  New York authority in the offices of the secretaries of  the  states  of
  New York and New Jersey and are hereinafter described in outline.
    §  3.  Tunnels  and  bridges to form part of the plan. (a) A tunnel or
  tunnels connecting the New Jersey shore and the Brooklyn  shore  of  New
  York  to  provide  through  line connection between the transcontinental
  railroads now having their terminals in New Jersey with the Long  Island
  railroad  and  the  New York connecting railroad on Long Island and with
  the New York Central and Hudson River railroad and  the  New  York,  New
  Haven  and  Hartford  railroad  in  the Bronx, and to provide continuous
  transportation  of  freight  between  the  Queens,  Brooklyn  and  Bronx
  sections  of  the  port to and from all parts of the westerly section of
  the port, for all of the transcontinental railroads.
    (b) A bridge and/or tunnel across or under the Arthur kill, and/or the
  existing bridge enlarged, to provide direct freight carriage between New
  Jersey and Staten Island.
    (c) The location of all such tunnels or bridges to be at the shortest,
  most accessible and most economical points practicable,  taking  account
  of  existing  facilities  now  located  within  the  port  district  and
  providing for and taking account of all  reasonably  foreseeable  future
  growth in all parts of the district.
    §  4.  Manhattan service. The island of Manhattan to be connected with
  New Jersey by bridge or tunnel, or both, and  freight  destined  to  and
  from Manhattan to be carried underground, so far as practicable, by such
  system,  automatic  electric  as  hereinafter described or otherwise, as
  will  furnish  the  most   expeditious,   economical   and   practicable
  transportation  of  freight,  especially  meat,  produce, milk and other
  commodities comprising the daily needs of the people. Suitable  markets,
  union  inland  terminal stations and warehouses to be laid out at points
  most convenient to the homes and industries upon the  island,  the  said
  system   to  be  connected  with  all  the  trans-continental  railroads
  terminating in New Jersey and by appropriate  connection  with  the  New
  York  Central  and  Hudson  River  railroad, the New York, New Haven and
  Hartford and the Long Island railroads.
    § 5. Belt lines. The numbers  hereinafter  used  correspond  with  the
  numbers  which  have been placed on the map of the comprehensive plan to
  identify the various belt lines and marginal railroads.
    Number 1. Middle belt line. Connects New Jersey and Staten Island  and
  the  railroads  on  the westerly side of the port with Brooklyn, Queens,
  the Bronx and the railroads on the easterly side of the port.   Connects
  with  the New York Central railroad in the Bronx; with the New York, New
  Haven and Hartford railroad in the Bronx; with the Long Island  railroad
  in  Queens  and  Brooklyn;  with  the  Baltimore  and Ohio railroad near
  Elizabethport and in Staten Island; with the Central Railroad Company of
  New Jersey at Elizabethport and at points in  Newark  and  Jersey  City;
  with  the  Pennsylvania  railroad  in  Newark  and Jersey City; with the
  Lehigh Valley railroad in Newark and Jersey  City;  with  the  Delaware,
  Lackawanna and Western railroad in Jersey City and the Secaucus meadows;
  with the Erie railroad in Jersey City and the Secaucus meadows; with the
  New York, Susquehanna and Western, the New York, Ontario and Western and
  the West Shore railroads on the westerly side of the Palisades above the
  Weehawken tunnel.
    The  route  of the middle belt line as shown on said map is in general
  as follows: Commencing at the Hudson river  at  Spuyten  Duyvil  running
  easterly  and  southerly generally along the easterly side of the Harlem

  river, utilizing existing lines so far as practicable and improving  and
  adding  where  necessary,  to a connection with Hell Gate bridge and the
  New Haven railroad, a distance  of  approximately  seven  miles;  thence
  continuing  in  a  general southerly direction, utilizing existing lines
  and improving and adding where necessary, to a point near Bay  Ridge,  a
  distance  of  approximately eighteen and one-half miles; thence by a new
  tunnel under New York bay in a northwesterly direction to  a  portal  in
  Jersey  City  or  Bayonne,  a distance of approximately five miles, to a
  connection with  the  tracks  of  the  Pennsylvania  and  Lehigh  Valley
  railroads;  thence in a generally northerly direction along the easterly
  side of Newark bay and the Hackensack river at the westerly foot of  the
  Palisades,  utilizing  existing  tracks  and  improving and adding where
  necessary, making connections with  the  Jersey  Central,  Pennsylvania,
  Lehigh  Valley,  Delaware,  Lackawanna  and  Western,  Erie,  New  York,
  Susquehanna and Western, New York, Ontario and Western, and  West  Shore
  railroads,  a  distance  of  approximately  ten miles. From the westerly
  portal of the Bay tunnel and from the line along the  easterly  side  of
  Newark  bay  by  the  bridges  of  the  Central  railroad  of New Jersey
  (crossing the Hackensack and Passaic rivers) and of the Pennsylvania and
  Lehigh Valley railroads (crossing Newark bay) to the line of the central
  railroad of New Jersey running along the westerly side of Newark bay and
  thence southerly along this line to a connection with the Baltimore  and
  Ohio railroad south of Elizabethport, utilizing existing lines so far as
  practicable  and  improving  and  adding  where necessary, a distance of
  approximately twelve miles; thence in an easterly direction crossing the
  Arthur  kill,  utilizing  existing  lines  so  far  as  practicable  and
  improving  and  adding where necessary, along the northerly and easterly
  shores of Staten Island to the new city piers and to  a  connection,  if
  the  city of New York consent thereto, with the tunnel under the Narrows
  to Brooklyn provided for under chapter seven hundred of the laws of  the
  state of New York for nineteen hundred and twenty-one.
    Number  2.  A marginal railroad to the Bronx extending along the shore
  of the East river and Westchester creek connecting with the middle  belt
  line  (number  one),  and  with  the  New  York,  New Haven and Hartford
  railroad in the vicinity of Westchester.
    Number 3. A marginal railroad in Queens and Brooklyn  extending  along
  Flushing creek, Flushing bay, the East river and the upper New York bay.
  Connects  with  the middle belt line (number one), by lines number four,
  number five, number six and directly at the southerly end at Bay  Ridge.
  Existing  lines  to  be utilized and improved and added to and new lines
  built where lines do not now exist.
    Number 4.  An  existing  line  to  be  improved  and  added  to  where
  necessary. Connects the middle belt line (number one), with the marginal
  railroad number three near its northeasterly end.
    Number  5.  An  existing  line  to  be  improved  and  added  to where
  necessary. Connects the middle belt line (number one), with the marginal
  railroad number three in Long Island City.
    Number 6. Connects  the  middle  belt  line  (number  one),  with  the
  marginal  railroad  number  three in the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn.
  The existing portion to be improved and added to where necessary.
    Number 7. A marginal railroad surrounding the northerly  and  westerly
  shores  of  Jamaica  bay. A new line. Connects with the middle belt line
  (number one).
    Number 8. An  existing  line,  to  be  improved  and  added  to  where
  necessary.  Extends  along  the  southeasterly  shore  of Staten Island.
  Connects with middle belt line (number one).
    Number 9. A marginal railroad extending along the  westerly  shore  of
  Staten  Island  and a branch connection with number eight. Connects with

  the middle belt line (number one), and with a branch from the outer belt
  line (number fifteen).
    Number 10. A line made up mainly of existing lines, to be improved and
  added  to  where  necessary.  Connects with the middle belt line (number
  one) by way of  marginal  railroad  number  eleven.  Extends  along  the
  southerly  shore  of  Raritan bay and through the territory south of the
  Raritan river reaching New Brunswick.
    Number 11. A marginal railroad extending from a  connection  with  the
  proposed  outer  belt line (number fifteen) near New Brunswick along the
  northerly shore of the Raritan river to Perth  Amboy,  thence  northerly
  along  the  westerly  side  of  the Arthur kill to a connection with the
  middle belt line (number one) south of  Elizabethport.  The  portion  of
  this line which exists to be improved and added to where necessary.
    Number  12.  A marginal railroad extending along the easterly shore of
  Newark bay and the Hackensack river and connects with  the  middle  belt
  line (number one). A new line.
    Number  13.  A  marginal railroad extending along the westerly side of
  the Hudson river and the Upper New York bay. Made up mainly of  existing
  lines----the   Erie  Terminals,  Jersey  Junction,  Hoboken  Shore,  and
  National Docks railroads. To be improved and added to  where  necessary.
  To be connected with middle belt line (number one).
    Number  14.  A  marginal railroad connecting with the middle belt line
  (number one), and extending through the Hackensack and Secaucus meadows.
    Number 15. An outer belt line, extending around the westerly limits of
  the port district beyond the congested section.  Northerly  terminus  on
  the  Hudson  river  at  Piermont.  Connects by marginal railroads at the
  southerly end with the harbor waters below  the  congested  section.  By
  spurs  connects  with  the middle belt line (number one) on the westerly
  shore of Newark bay and with the marginal railroad on the westerly shore
  of Staten Island (number nine).
    Number 16. The automatic electric system for serving Manhattan Island.
  Its yards to connect  with  the  middle  belt  line  and  with  all  the
  railroads  of  the  port district. A standard gauge underground railroad
  deep enough in Manhattan to  permit  of  two  levels  of  rapid  transit
  subways to pass over it. Standard railroad cars to be brought through to
  Manhattan  terminals  for  perishables and food products in refrigerator
  cars.  Cars with merchandise freight to be stopped at its yards. Freight
  from standard cars to be transferred onto wheeled containers, thence  to
  special  electrically  propelled  cars  which will bear it to Manhattan.
  Freight to be kept on wheels between the door of  the  standard  freight
  car  at  the  transfer  point  and  the  tail  board of the truck at the
  Manhattan terminal or the store door as may be elected by the shipper or
  consignee, eliminating extra handling.
    Union terminal stations to be located on Manhattan in zones as far  as
  practicable of equal trucking distance, as to pickups and deliveries, to
  be  served  by this system. Terminals to contain storage space and space
  for other facilities. The system to bring all the railroads of the  port
  to Manhattan.
    §  6. The determination of the exact location, system and character of
  each  of  the   said   tunnels,   bridges,   belt   lines,   approaches,
  classification  yards, warehouses, terminals or other improvements shall
  be made by the port authority after public hearings and  further  study,
  but in general the location thereof shall be as indicated upon said map,
  and as herein described.
    §  7.  The right to add to, modify or change any part of the foregoing
  comprehensive plan is reserved by each state, with  the  concurrence  of
  the other.

    §  8. The port of New York authority is hereby authorized and directed
  to proceed with the development of the port of New  York  in  accordance
  with   said  comprehensive  plan  as  rapidly  as  may  be  economically
  practicable and is hereby vested  with  all  necessary  and  appropriate
  powers not inconsistent with the constitution of the United States or of
  either  state, to effectuate the same, except the power to levy taxes or
  assessments. It shall request the congress of the United States to  make
  such appropriations for deepening and widening channels and to make such
  grants of power as will enable the said plan to be effectuated. It shall
  have  power  to  apply to all federal agencies, including the interstate
  commerce commission, the war department, and the United States  shipping
  board,  for  suitable  assistance  in  carrying  out said plan. It shall
  cooperate with the state highway commissioners of  each  state  so  that
  trunk line highways as and when laid out by each state shall fit in with
  said  comprehensive  plan.  It  shall render such advice, suggestion and
  assistance to all municipal officials  as  will  permit  all  local  and
  municipal port and harbor improvements, so far as practicable, to fit in
  with  said  plan.  All  municipalities  within  the  district are hereby
  authorized and empowered to cooperate in the effectuation of said  plan,
  and  are  hereby  vested  with  such  powers  as  may  be appropriate or
  necessary so to cooperate. The bonds or other securities issued  by  the
  port authority shall at all times be free from taxation by either state.
  The  port  authority  shall  be  regarded  as  the  municipal  corporate
  instrumentality of the two states for the purpose of developing the port
  and effectuating the pledge of the states in the said  compact,  but  it
  shall  have  no  power to pledge the credit of either state or to impose
  any obligation upon either state, or upon any  municipality,  except  as
  and  when  such power is expressly granted by statute, or the consent by
  any such municipality is given.
    § 9. The sum of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000),  or  so  much
  thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated out of any moneys in
  the  state  treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the expenses of the
  port authority. The moneys hereby appropriated shall be paid out by  the
  state  treasurer on the warrant of the comptroller upon vouchers audited
  by the chairman of the port authority.
    § 10. All acts and parts of  acts  inconsistent  herewith  are  hereby
  repealed, and this act shall take effect immediately.
    §  11.  To facilitate the determination of the economic practicability
  of any step in the said comprehensive plan, or  of  any  other  fact  or
  matter which the port authority is authorized and empowered to decide or
  determine,  the  port authority may conduct investigations, inquiries or
  hearings at such place or places and at such times as it shall  appoint.
  Such  investigations, inquiries or hearings may be held by or before one
  or more of the commissioners of the port authority, or by or before  any
  person  or  persons  appointed as its representative, and when ratified,
  approved or confirmed by the port authority on its action shall  be  and
  be  deemed  to  be  the  investigation,  inquiry  or hearing of the port
  authority.
    For the purpose of such investigations, inquiries or hearings, and  of
  such  other  action or powers as the port authority may be authorized or
  empowered to take or exercise, it shall have jurisdiction of any and all
  persons, associations,  or  corporations,  residing  in,  or  acting  or
  existing under or by virtue of the laws of, or owning property or coming
  within this state.
    §  12.  Attendance  of  witness  and production of documents. The port
  authority shall have the power to compel the attendance of witnesses and
  the  production  of  any  papers,  books  or  other  documents,  and  to
  administer  oaths  to  all  witnesses  who  may  be  called  before  it.

  Subpoenas issued by the port authority shall be signed by a commissioner
  or by the secretary of the port authority. No witness subpoenaed at  the
  instance  of  parties other than the port authority shall be entitled to
  compensation  therefrom  for  attendance or travel, but the cost thereof
  shall be borne by the party at whose instance the witness  is  summoned,
  unless the port authority otherwise orders. A subpoena issued under this
  section shall be regulated by the civil practice law and rules.
    §  13. 1. All hearings before the port authority, including the taking
  of testimony, shall be governed by rules to be adopted and prescribed by
  it.
    2. In any investigation, inquiry or hearing before the port authority,
  a commissioner or an officer conducting the  investigation,  inquiry  or
  hearing may confer immunity in accordance with the provisions of section
  50.20 of the criminal procedure law.
    3. No commissioner or employee of the port authority shall be required
  to give testimony in any civil suit to which the port authority is not a
  party with regard to information obtained by him in the discharge of his
  official duty.
    §  14.  Every  order  of the port authority shall be served upon every
  person, association or corporation to be  affected  thereby,  either  by
  personal delivery of a certified copy thereof, or by mailing a certified
  copy thereof, in a sealed package with postage prepaid, to the person to
  be  affected  thereby; or in the case of a corporation to any officer or
  agent thereof upon whom a summons might  be  served,  either  within  or
  without the state, in accordance with law. It shall be the duty of every
  person,  association  or  corporation,  to  notify  the  port  authority
  forthwith, in writing, of the receipt of the  certified  copy  of  every
  order so served, and in the case of a corporation such notification must
  be signed and acknowledged by a person or officer duly authorized by the
  corporation  to admit such service. Within a time specified in the order
  of the port authority, such person,  association  or  corporation,  upon
  whom  it  is  served, must, if so required in the order, notify the port
  authority in like manner whether the terms of the order are accepted and
  will be obeyed. Every order of the port authority shall take effect at a
  time therein specified and shall continue in force either for  a  period
  which  may  be  designated therein, or until changed or abrogated by the
  port authority, unless such order be  unauthorized  by  law,  or  be  in
  violation  of  a  provision  of the constitution of the state, or of the
  United States.
    No order staying or suspending an order of the port authority shall be
  made by any court otherwise than upon notice and after hearing,  and  if
  the  order  of the port authority is suspended, the order suspending the
  same shall contain a specific finding based upon evidence  submitted  to
  the court and identified by reference thereto that great and irreparable
  damage  would  otherwise  result  to  the  petitioner and specifying the
  nature of the damage.
    § 15. Whenever the port authority shall be of  the  opinion  that  any
  person,  association  or  corporation  subject  to  its  jurisdiction is
  failing or omitting, or about to fail or omit to do anything required of
  it by the laws governing the development and regulation of the  port  of
  New  York,  or  by its order, or is doing or is about to do anything, or
  permitting, or about to permit anything to be done contrary  to,  or  in
  violation   of,   such   law  or  orders,  it  shall  direct  its  legal
  representative to commence an action or proceeding in the  name  of  the
  port  authority,  in  an  appropriate court having jurisdiction, for the
  purpose of having such violations, or threatened violations, stopped and
  prevented either by mandamus or injunction. Such an action or proceeding
  may be brought in the supreme court of this state, and  the  said  court

  shall   have   and   is  hereby  given  the  necessary  and  appropriate
  jurisdiction to grant mandamus or injunction, as the case  may  require,
  or any other relief appropriate to the case.
    Failure  of such person, association or corporation to notify the port
  authority, as required in the preceding section, of  its  acceptance  of
  and  willingness to obey any order of the port authority shall be and be
  deemed to  be  prima  facie  proof  that  such  person,  association  or
  corporation  is  guilty  of such violation, or threatened violation. The
  legal representative of the port authority shall begin  such  action  or
  proceeding  by  a  petition  to  the  appropriate  court,  alleging  the
  violation complained of and praying for appropriate  relief  by  way  of
  mandamus  or  injunction. If the petition is directed to a court of this
  state, it shall thereupon be the duty of the court to specify the  time,
  not  exceeding  twenty days after the service of a copy of the petition,
  within which the person, association or corporation complained  of  must
  answer  the petition. In case of default in answer, or after answer, the
  court shall immediately inquire into the  facts  and  circumstances,  in
  such manner as the court shall direct, without other or formal pleadings
  and  without  respect  to any technical requirement. Such other persons,
  associations or corporations as the court shall deem necessary or proper
  to join as parties, in order  to  make  its  order,  judgment  or  writs
  effective,  may  be  joined  as  parties  upon  application of the legal
  representative of the port authority. The final  judgment  in  any  such
  action  or  proceeding shall either dismiss the action or proceeding, or
  direct that a writ of mandamus, or an  injunction,  or  both,  issue  as
  prayed  for  in  the  petition, or in such modified or other form as the
  court may determine will afford the appropriate relief.
    § 16. Whenever the port authority, after opportunity  to  the  parties
  affected or to be affected thereby to be heard, shall determine any fact
  or  matter  which  it  is authorized by any law to hear or determine, or
  that any step in the effectuation of the comprehensive plan is or in the
  near future will be economically practicable, it shall make its findings
  in writing, setting forth its reasons therefor, and such findings  shall
  be  and be deemed to be a determination by the port authority, under and
  pursuant to law. Upon such determination an  appropriate  order  may  be
  entered  by the port authority and be made effective and may be enforced
  as herein provided.
    If such findings or determination shall require the  use  of  existing
  facilities  or  any part thereof described in the law, owned or operated
  by any carrier or carriers,  then  the  port  authority  may  order  and
  require  the  carrier  or  carriers  owning  or  operating said railroad
  facilities or part thereof to permit the use of such facilities or  part
  thereof  upon  the  payment  of reasonable compensation therefor. If the
  carrier or carriers affected or to be affected by such order  shall  not
  be  able,  within  the  time  to  be  specified in its order by the port
  authority, to agree among themselves upon the compensation to be paid by
  a user to a  proprietor  or  operator  for  the  use  of  such  existing
  facilities   or  part  thereof,  then  the  port  authority  shall  make
  determination of the amount to be paid by the user  to  the  proprietary
  carrier  or  carriers,  taking  all  the  facts  and  circumstances into
  account, including the public use to which  such  facilities  have  been
  put;  or,  at  its  option,  the port authority may apply to the supreme
  court of this state, either in a separate proceeding or  in  proceedings
  by mandamus or injunction to enforce its order, to fix and determine the
  fair  and  reasonable  compensation  to  be  paid  by  the  user  to the
  proprietary carrier or carriers for such use. If any  carrier  shall  be
  dissatisfied  with  the  findings of the port authority in the matter of
  the compensation to be paid for the use of  any  existing  facility,  it

  shall  have  the  right  to review the same in the supreme court of this
  state by taking appropriate proceedings for  such  review  within  sixty
  days  from  the  service of the order of the port authority, but pending
  such review the order for the use of such facilities shall be operative,
  the determination of the compensation by the court to relate back to the
  time  of  the commencement of such user, unless the court shall for good
  and proper reasons enjoin the operation of such order.
    If, in the determination of  steps  to  effectuate  the  comprehensive
  plan, the port authority shall determine that one or more union terminal
  stations  are  then, or in the near future, economically practicable, it
  shall call a conference of all the carriers affected or to  be  affected
  by the use of such terminal stations or station and shall submit to them
  a  plan  or plans for the construction, maintenance and use thereof.  If
  the carriers or any of them shall fail or  refuse  to  agree  upon  such
  plan,  the  port  authority  shall  make  and  certify  its findings and
  conclusions to the supreme court of this state, and the  said  court  is
  vested  with  appropriate and adequate jurisdiction to determine whether
  or not such plan or plans for a union station or stations effectuate the
  comprehensive plan, and to make such conditions and impose such terms as
  will carry out the same in accordance with the  principles  embraced  in
  the comprehensive plan and the laws governing the same.
    § 17. All actions and proceedings to which the port authority may be a
  party  and  in  which any question arises under the laws relating to the
  port authority, or under or concerning any of  its  orders  or  actions,
  shall  be preferred over all other civil causes, except election causes,
  in all courts of this  state  and  shall  be  heard  and  determined  in
  preference  to all other civil business pending therein, except election
  causes, irrespective of position on the calendar.  The  same  preference
  shall  be  granted  upon  application of the legal representative of the
  port authority, in any action or proceeding in which he may  be  allowed
  to intervene.

  
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Last modified: September 11, 2016